Shoulder Care

Shoulder conditions occur in the shoulder joint which can prevent us from bending, flexing, reaching or rotating our arms.

Shoulder Conditions

Shoulder Specialists At Wisconsin Bone & Joint

The physicians at Wisconsin Bone & Joint utilize cutting-edge technology to assess, diagnose and work with patients to develop innovative treatment plans for a variety of shoulder conditions and injuries. Our team of physicians is committed to finding you the best treatment for neck and shoulder pain that suits your individual needs.

Providing trusted Orthopedic care in the community for over 40+ years

At Wisconsin Bone and Joint, we pride ourselves with providing you highly personalized and comprehensive orthopedic care. Our philosophy of direct physician-to-patient care means your physician will be an intrical part of every stage of your care. This commitment to a dedicated continuum-of-care model has made us one of the most trusted and respected practices in Southeast Wisconsin and greater Milwaukee area.

FAQs on Shoulder Conditions

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Shoulder Conditions

Shoulder conditions occur in the shoulder joint which can prevent us from bending, flexing, reaching, or rotating our arms. However, repetitive overhead movements that are common to some sports and jobs frequently overstress the shoulder joints resulting in injury. When problems related to tendon tears, instability, fractures, arthritis and other conditions impede movement, both surgical and non-surgical treatments are considered to ease pain and help restore movement. The shoulder is a ball and socket joint. The ball is called the head of the humerus and the socket is called the glenoid (it’s part of your shoulder blade, also known as the scapula). Sometimes, arthritis can form here. On top of this ball and socket joint is another bone known as the acromion. This is a frequent place for bone spurs to form. Right next door to the acromion is the acromioclavicular joint or “AC joint” for short. This is a common place for shoulder separations.

A group of 4 muscles helps to move your shoulder joint; they are called the rotator cuff. These muscles work together to help get your arm up over your head, as well as rotate it in and out. That’s why rotator cuff injuries usually result in weakness, especially in trying to raise the arm overhead. One of the 4 muscles is injured much more frequently than the others; it is known as the supraspinatus muscle. In addition, these rotator cuff muscles function to help keep your shoulder “in socket”, or “located” (when the shoulder comes out of socket, it’s called “dis-located”). You have several ligaments in your shoulder that help to keep it in place. Finally, there’s an “O-ring” around the socket, called the labrum, which also helps keep your shoulder in socket and causes pain and popping when it’s torn. At some time in life, you may experience shoulder pain.