Gluteus Medius Tear

The gluteus medius is a muscle on the outside of the hip, which is important for abduction (lateral movement away from the body). These muscles help one stand up right and walk without a limp.

Gluteus medius tears, also known as the rotator cuff tear of the hip, involve tearing of the gluteus medius muscle from its attachment to the greater trochanter, commonly known as the “lateral hip bone”.

Gluteus medius tears may cause persistent pain mimicing trochanteric bursitis. They may also cause weakness and limping.

When physical therapy and injections in the trochanteric bursa do not provide lasting relief, the diagnosis of gluteus medius tear should be suspected.

In many cases, a torn gluteus medius can be repaired arthroscopically by sewing the torn part of the gluteus medius tendon back to the bone using tiny suture-anchors.

This procedure has a high success rate in treating pain, and may restore strength to the gluteus medius muscle.

If the tear is too large, an open gluteus medius repair may be undertaken. Similar anchors are used to stabilize the repair or the tendon to the bone. In rare cases where the gluteus medius is atrophied, the gluteus maximus may be transfered restoring strength and function to the hip abductors.

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Tips for Healthy Joints

  • One of the best ways to avoid or reduce joint discomfort is to lose excess body weight. Less weight equals less stress on your joints.
  • Be sure to get adequate amounts of vitamin C and calcium. Vitamin C is necessary to for the formation of collagen that supports joint tissue. Calcium helps build strong bones, which reduces stress on joints.
  • Stretching and strengthening activities can help maintain your range of motion, build muscle and promote flexibility. Some activities to consider include gardening, walking, bicycling and swimming. Talk with your physician about which exercises are right for you.
  • Keep moving. Sitting or standing all day can cause joint stiffness.
  • When possible, alternate between these two positions, ideally every 30 minutes.
  • Remember to warm up and cool down every time you exercise to prevent injury and promote flexibility.
  • Exercise in groups. It’s motivating, it’s social, and it builds self-esteem as you accomplish your goals together.
  • If you’re having a hard time staying motivated to exercise regularly, consider adding music to your routine. Purchase a portable music player and bring along the tunes while you walk, jog, etc.