Dislocations

A dislocation is an injury to a joint — a place where two or more of your bones come together — in which the ends of your bones are forced from their normal positions. This painful injury temporarily deforms and immobilizes your joint.

Dislocation is most common in the shoulders and fingers. Other sites for dislocations include the elbows, knees and hips. If you suspect a dislocation, seek prompt medical attention to return your bones to their proper positions.

When treated properly, most dislocations return to normal function after several weeks of rest and rehabilitation. However, some joints, such as your shoulder, may have an increased risk of repeat dislocation.

Ankle Dislocation

A dislocated ankle is a condition characterized by damage and tearing of the connective tissue surrounding the ankle joint with subsequent displacement of the bones forming the joint so they are no longer situated next to each other.

 Finger Dislocation

Finger dislocation is a common injury. It occurs when the bones of the finger are moved (dislocated) from their normal anatomic position. Finger dislocation can occur in any of the joints of any finger, but it occurs most often in the middle knuckle of the little, ring, middle, or index finger.

Hip Dislocation

A traumatic hip dislocation occurs when the head of the thighbone (femur) is forced out of its socket in the hip bone (pelvis). It typically takes a major force to dislocate the hip. Car collisions and falls from significant heights are common causes and, as a result, other injuries like broken bones often occur with the dislocation. 

Knee Dislocation

Kneecap dislocation occurs when the triangle-shaped bone covering the knee (patella) moves or slides out of place. The problem usually occurs toward the outside of the leg. 

Shoulder Dislocation

A shoulder dislocation is an injury that occurs when the top of the arm bone (humerus) loses contact with the socket of the shoulder (scapula).

When a shoulder dislocation is diagnosed, the shoulder must be put back in place or “reduced.”

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