COVID-19 Update

Wisconsin Bone and Joint is committed to developing a protocol to help stop the spread of the virus within our office.

Effective 3/16/2020, we will remain open to provide care for urgent and post-operative patients.  If you have a non-urgent or elective issue we will be calling to reschedule your appointment.

The health and wellbeing of our patients and staff are very important.  If you or someone you know are experiencing symptoms of fever, dry cough, or shortness of breath, or you think you may have been exposed to COVID-19, please call to cancel your appointment.

This is an evolving situation, please check back often for updates.

Thank you,

Wisconsin Bone and Joint, S.C.

Wrist Tendonitis Surgery

Your hands and wrists are essential tools that allow you to work, play and perform everyday activities. How well the hand and wrist interact depends on the integrity and function of the ligaments, tendons, muscles, joints and bones.

Problems in any of these can affect upper extremity function, causing disruptions at home and work and negatively impacting quality of life.

The human hand itself is very complex and delicate in structure. Hand surgery requires a completely different surgical approach from a qualified hand and wrist surgeon whether treating fractures, arthritis or deformities. Hand surgery traditionally includes treatment of the entire hand, wrist and forearm.

Again, this whole region works as a single unit, and the dysfunction of a single part needs consideration of the whole. An additional year of training is required for those orthopaedic surgeons seeking certification in hand and wrist surgery.

At some time in life, you may experience hand and wrist pain.

Surgical Treatment

If the initial treatment options have failed to modify the symptoms, then surgery may be recommended.

In this procedure, the tight tendon sheath area that has been restricting the tendon movements can be released. In addition, any inflamed tissue in the area can also be removed at that time. This will create needed space thus allowing the tendon to move freely.

Surgery can be quite successful in improving the pain of tendonitis in patients in which the non-surgical approaches have failed.

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