Non-Operative Wrist Fracture/Sprain Treatment

Treatment of scaphoid fractures depends on the location of the break in the bone.

Fracture Near the Thumb

Scaphoid fractures that are closer to the thumb usually heal in a matter of weeks with proper protection. This part of the scaphoid bone has a good supply of blood, which is necessary for healing.

Your doctor will place your arm and hand in a cast. The cast will usually be below the elbow. It may or may not include the thumb.

The time it takes for the fracture to heal varies from person to person. Your doctor will monitor the healing by taking periodic x-rays or other imaging studies, such as a computed tomography (CT) scan. These imaging studies are used to confirm that the bone has healed.

Fracture Near the Forearm

If the scaphoid is broken in the middle of the bone (waist) or closer to the forearm (proximal pole), healing is more difficult. These areas of the scaphoid do not have a very good blood supply.

If your doctor treats this type of fracture with a cast, the cast will probably include the thumb. It may extend above the elbow, as well.

Sprains

Moderate sprains may need to be immobilized with a wrist splint for 1 or more weeks. This immobilization may cause some stiffness in your wrist and your doctor may recommend some stretching exercises to help you regain full mobility.

Your Doctors